ENDLESS SUMMER | Nourishing Mango Mask. Your getaway awaits.

June 27, 2020

ENDLESS SUMMER | Nourishing Mango Mask. Your getaway awaits.

 

  • Butters nourish dry, dehydrated skin
  • Antioxidant Vitamin C brightens and evens complexion
  • Oils fortify skin’s natural lipid barrier

If you’re reading the name of this mask and hoping that it delivers, it does. I have long referred to this mask as a mini-vacation. It applies like butter to the skin, since it is, in fact, made of butters: mango, shea, and murumuru butter (more on this amazing rainforest fruit later). What happens next is something I can only describe as suddenly being surrounded by white sand, azure waves and the feeling that you get when you lie back in the water and it covers your ears and you can hear this kind of high pitched empty sound as you bob along on the surface. The sun intermittently blanches out the details of the world as you float along in any given direction. A weightless bouy supports your perfectly imperfect body that fills your bathing suit out exactly as it was meant to, because #effyourbeautystandards. When we empty our minds of endless external input about what constitutes “beautiful”, we create internal space for our own deeper evolutionary work to begin. We can collectively breathe and heal the wounds of oppression that show up as slick slippery magazine pages, outlining every naturally-born detail about you that apparently isn’t “enough”. Eventually you find your way back to land. Sandy. Salty. Warm skin. Cool breeze. And you slice open a fresh mango, fallen from a nearby tree. The shade of which you luxuriate in quietly, in defiance of all things time and space and judgement. Yes, it delivers.

Your skin will feel supple, hydrated and glowing. And even though you may be rinsing this mask off using the baby’s bathwater while responding to an email, the space you created in this moment is something you get to keep just for you. A secret splice of pleasure. In a world filled with unrest, self care is a radical movement. It’s ok to burn down the patriarchy with your best skin yet. 

And mango butter isn’t the only superstar ingredient.

Introducing: the Magic of Murumuru. Murumuru fruit oil is harvested in Brazil’s Amazon basin from the native palms growing along its riverbanks. This area of Brazil’s rainforest has typically been threatened by deforestation, which is what makes the murumuru trees incredibly important to the local economy: their fruit can be sustainably harvested without creating damage to nearby flora and fauna. As the ripened fruit falls, they are collected, dried and processed into butter. What’s more, this viable alternative to logging also has many benefits to your skin:

  • Soothing, anti-inflammatory, and great for conditions like eczema and psoriasis
  • Nourishes and heals damaged skin
  • Locks in moisture

Your getaway is a singular click away: https://lilacandflint.com/products/endless-summer-nourishing-mango-mask


Be sure to tag me on insta @lilacandflint and let me know where you went on your mini-vacay :)




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